Friday, January 26, 2007

Brain Stretching

5 comments:

Plato said...

LOL. Of course you know I may have meant "brane?" :)

stefan said...

Dear Bee,

that's funny :-)

Is brain stretching also good against headaches? I'll have to try...

Best, stefan

Cynthia said...

Hi Plato!

Perhaps this comic strip is still floating about in bulk space, unable to become sequestered within a brane.;)

All the best,
Cynthia

Plato said...

Cynthia:Perhaps this comic strip is still floating about in bulk space, unable to become sequestered within a brane.;)

The "child in us" is free to explore the limits that we may apply to certain areas of inspection(our universe)? It is only after we understand "the physics" that the "parent in us" asks that we move ahead slowly and try and keep in touch with the physics.

Some well grounded parents with their children saw that to speak about cosmology, it was was "okay" to move beyond "that subject."

So it took a brave soul as a adult like Gabriele Veneziano to "think like the child," "act as the parent" and remain open as the adult?

While one should not think the parent to be the "death of anything" it is no doubt the conclusion to which we have applied our constraints.

While using a "psychological model" here in comparison, if you saw
the "subject of Veneziano's use of the painting by the 1897 painting by Paul Gauguin: D'ou venons? Que sommes-nous? Ou allons-nous, then looking at "model apprehension" would seem to take a brave soul(adult) even amidst their peers?

Cycle of Birth, Life, and Death-Origin, Indentity, and Destiny by Gabriele Veneziano


Was the big bang really the beginning of time? Or did the universe exist before then? Such a question seemed almost blasphemous only a decade ago. Most cosmologists insisted that it simply made no sense - that to contemplate a time before the big bang was like asking for directions to a place north of the North Pole. But developments in theoretical physics, especially the rise of string theory, have changed their perspective. The pre-bang universe has become the latest frontier of cosmology.

The new willingness to consider what might have happened before the bang is the latest swing of an intellectual pendulum that has rocked back and forth for millennia. In one form or another, the issue of the ultimate beginning has engaged philosophers and theologians in nearly every culture. It is entwined with a grand set of concerns, one famously encapsulated in an 1897 painting by Paul Gauguin: D'ou venons-nous? Que sommes-nous? Ou allons-nous? "Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?"

Cynthia said...

Plato,

Thanks for saying it so beautifully...

Have a most enjoyable weekend!
Cynthia