Saturday, July 18, 2009

Hubble 3D

The IMAX Corporation, NASA and Warner Bros. Pictures are working on a 3D movie about the Hubble telescope. According to the blurb "it will chronicle the amazing saga of the greatest success in space since the Moon Landing. Featuring stunning on-orbit coverage of the telescope's final repair and jaw-dropping IMAX 3D flights through distant galaxies, Hubble's astonishing legacy will be captured for generations to come." It is scheduled to be released Spring 2010. More information on this website. Here is some amazing video clips from YouTube that might or might not be related to the movie






19 comments:

Neil' said...

Such a movie would be well-deserved by the Hubble team and the telescope. It's both a font of discovery and of cool "wowiness". And 3-D is neato, especially to me since I think I found why our universe had to have that many large space dimensions (see blog.) We have an IMAX here in Hampton VA (Virginia Air & Space Center), I love watching it. They remastered "Apollo XIII" and it looked great, with authentic-looking new detail (but 2-D.)

They need to be honest about the initial mirror flub, and also since fixing that was clever and inspiring.

PS: May I ask, which of "D" or "d" is the preferred notation for large dimensions of space, or of spacetime together? I seem to see varying standards.

Neil' said...

(Note: the local IMAX didn't remaster "Apollo XIII", "they" were the producers of the rerelease.)

Uncle Al said...

1) The Hubble is a Keyhole satellite pointed the other way. 2) NASA FUBARed everything, at obscene expense, by rolling its own. 3) The main mirror is a $10+ billion disaster. An old fart said the rough grind was wrong. He was fired. 4) Absence of a heavy lifter compromises the Hubble for orbit, for hardware, and for maintenance.

Dump NASA and put Mythbusters in charge.

Phil Warnell said...

Hi Bee,

Thanks for the Hubble flicks, as I can’t get enough of the stuff. With our now planned return to the moon I am hopeful that they will construct a telescope there where the low gravity would allow for mirror dimensions many times greater that on earth and no atmospheric distortion or light pollution, yet more conventional in most other respects. Oh if it were only possible to be born again. I would work hard to be considered appointed as the first Astronomer Royal of Moon;-)
Best,

Phil

Phil Warnell said...

Hi Bee,


Just in relation to the Hubble and space exploration it has been reported the sad passing of Walter Cronkite, for which many represented to be simply an icon in regards to the reporting of the news. However, when I think of Mr. Cronkite he presents to me as my personal spokesperson and guide during those earlier years of space exploration. I can still see myself with my attention fixed on Cronkite as the time for each heart pounding launch of the Mercury program approached to be so well explained and humanized by him.

This proceeded to be the same up to and beyond the moon landings, where it always seemed that his excitement, wonder and expectation was the same or even exceeded my own. What I had long wished for is that he’d been given the opportunity to be taken on a mission himself, for what he may have lacked in expertise, he overcame by having and so able to express the vision that such human endeavours truly represent as being. He will be missed by many and for me in particular for the reasons I’ve attempted to convey.

Sincerely,

Phil

Phil Warnell said...

Hi Bee,

Just in addition to what I said earlier about Walter Cronkite is to suggest that president Obama and NASA should be urged to consider naming there next program of manned exploration after him in honour of his contribution. I would say if there was ever a single reason for why interest in space exploration waned so much for the general public in recent years, is that they have never been able to find anyone to replace him in what they still fail to realize as being a most important and vital role.

Best,

Phil

Bee said...

Hi Phil,

It has always puzzled me why people want to fly to the moon. While I do like the idea humans are able to visit the moon, I personally fail to see the appeal of being confined to a space shuttle for endless days just to then stand on a dusty piece of rock. Excuse the blasphemy, but I think I'd wait for the warp drive ;-) Best,

B.

Bee said...

btw, Forbes has today an article by Michio Kaku

The Cost Of Space Exploration

that might be of interest for one or the other reader.

Andrew Thomas said...

Bee: "Excuse the blasphemy, but I think I'd wait for the warp drive ;-)

I can remember a short SF story about that. The human race decides it wants to colonise the nearest planet. But it will take 70 years to reach the nearest planet in todays slow rocket ships, and it'll even take 30 years just to exit the Solar System. So they send a group of very young men and women in a rocket ship.

The men and women make the best of their 30 years in confinement as they pass the all the various planets of our Solar System. But it is hell being trapped in a small spacecraft for so long. And just as they are about to leave the Solar System, after 30 long years, the entire human race shoots past them in millions of small ships powered by the newly-discovered warp drive!

Phil Warnell said...

Hi Bee,

“It has always puzzled me why people want to fly to the moon..... Excuse the blasphemy, but I think I'd wait for the warp drive ;-)”

I thought for certain a theoretical physicist would appreciate the difference between embarking on a journey into the unknown, in search of discovery and simply transportation. It’s begins being seated on top of what is essentially a controlled bomb, with the countdown running to zero, followed by those words “we have lift off”. Then a few days later, to do it all again , only in reverse, touching down on a foreign world having an environment for which no living creature is naturally adapted to exist. You venture out to climb down a few steps and as you first look to this new horizon you see your own planet rise in the blackness of space.

Some think this is something so inspiring; it’s even worth risking one’s life to experience.
True, after the tourists move in, this sort will be looking for new trails to blaze, without much thought of who will be to follow. Yes indeed, it was one small step for a man and one giant leap for mankind, yet do you truly think this be the reason such types dare to go or it be the reason that many theoretical physicists dare to discover in their own way? Then again some prefer the Ferris wheel, while others the roller coaster ;-)

Best,

Phil


P.S. I give thanks on this most fitting of days for those few who consider the risks be worth it.

Bee said...

Hi Phil,

I thought for certain a theoretical physicist would appreciate the difference between embarking on a journey into the unknown, in search of discovery and simply transportation. It’s begins being seated on top of what is essentially a controlled bomb,

Sure, I totally appreciate that. I just prefer sitting on a couch. It's of course necessary to sufficiently praise those who are crazy enough to risk their lives, so yeah, they are the true heroes, etc. Best,

B.

Bee said...

Hi Neil',

I don't think there's a standard notation for the large dimensions of space. There used to be an IMAX in Frankfurt, but it closed pretty soon after opening. Not sure why, but I myself am not very into 3-D movies, the ones that I've seen all suffered from absence of a sensible plot. Best,

B.

Plato said...

Bee:I personally fail to see the appeal of being confined to a space shuttle for endless days just to then stand on a dusty piece of rock

Baby steps Bee, for the miners and space exploration teams of the future.

Placement of mirrors to do odd trials and experiments. How ingenious.

Plato said...

Clementine color ratio composite image of Aristarchus Crater on the Moon. This 42 km diameter crater is located on the corner of the Aristarchus plateau, at 24 N, 47 W. Ejecta from the plateau is visible as the blue material at the upper left (northwest), while material excavated from the Oceanus Procellarum area is the reddish color to the lower right (southeast). The colors in this image can be used to ascertain compositional properties of the materials making up the deep strata of these two regions. (Clementine, USGS slide 11) See:Clementine Project Information
or The Clementine gravity experiment used measurements of perturbations in the motion of the spacecraft to infer the lunar gravity field

Plato said...

oops on second link Clementine S-Band Transponder Doppler Gravity Experiment

Plato said...

So you can see how progression of Hubble Experiment allows one to see "previous experiments" in a new light? Lagrangian interpretations of three body problems now take on a whole new meaning.

Best,

Phil Warnell said...

Hi Bee,

“Sure, I totally appreciate that. I just prefer sitting on a couch.”

Well I couldn’t find a coach that could help you explore the great unknown, yet how about a chair. Although come to think of it you won’t be the first, since that’s already been accredited to a 16th century Chinese astronaut . However, rumour has it that it might have all been staged and never really did take place, so you may still be able to stake a claim :-)

Best,

Phil

chris said...

Hi,
Maybe a naive question, but how did they get 3D position information for the nebula?

chris

Bee said...

Hi Chris,

Good question. Stefan and I, we were wondering about this as well, but we don't really know either. If there are objects within the nebula you can probably determine their distance in the usual way. I would also guess that if there are objects behind the nebula you can determine its depth from the absorption, in various ranges of the spectrum. That should give you some pieces of the data. It might well be that to some extend the pictures are simply extrapolations. But it might be there's more data that's being used which hasn't occurred to us. Best,

B.