Friday, February 02, 2007

Top 10 Microphotographs of Living Things

This is, believe it or not, how the dead fly on your window sill looks like if you get really close

[Proboscis of common housefly, Dark-field microscopy 10x
Photo Credits: Ralph Grimm, Jimboomba, Australia]



From: SciAM, February 01, 2007
Top 10 Microphotographs of Living Things
Prize-winning microviews of everything from mouse retinas to slime mold

15 comments:

stefan said...

Dear Bee,

truely amazing photos!

Ahem, but I would have chosen a less Alien-like, terrifying one ;-), maybe the mini-squids...

Cheers, Stefan

Rae Ann said...

The Zinnia flower primordium is like a mandala. Beautiful and fascinating. Your "distractions" are always so thought-provoking! Thanks for that!

QUASAR9 said...

Hi Bee, awesome Olympus photos
I can't wait for the one of a bee collecting honey & neutrinos

Bee said...

Dear Stefan,

arg, I liked the fly best, at least it looks really DEAD and not like something that might show up in your Jelly Beans!

Dear Rae Ann,

:-) Nature never ceases to fascinate me.

Dear Quasar,

I'll try to shot a picture of a neutrino if one comes by and is willing to interact ;-)

Best,

B.

Markk said...

Great photo. Is there a way to turn off that Snap thing though? I get my cursor near the picture and it is covered by a Tax Cut add from Scientific American - where the pic is linked from.

India, the Hippie Chick said...

That's amazing and somehow beautiful!

QUASAR9 said...

Hi Bee,
you entered into an alliance with Zig?
ZigBee Alliance

Bee said...

Hey Markk,

yeah, I've turned the preview off. They've sent me a message that there will be an update some time that can be customized. But as it is right now, it started annoying me. Not so much because of the preview itself, but because on most links one had to click twice before one could use it - anybody else noticed that? What I would actually like to have is the possibility to turn the feature on or of in my brower, not for a website. But it's a nice idea. Anyway, thanks for the feedback.

-B.

Bee said...

Hey Quasar,

:-) Did you see what they write in their FAQs?

What is the origin of the ZigBee name?

The domestic honeybee, a colonial insect, lives in a hive that contains a queen, a few male drones, and thousands of worker bees. The survival, success, and future of the colony is dependent upon continuous communication of vital information between every member of the colony. The technique that honey bees use to communicate new-found food sources to other members of the colony is referred to as the ZigBee Principle. Using this silent, but powerful communication system, whereby the bee dances in a zig-zag pattern, she is able to share information such as the location, distance, and direction of a newly discovered food source to her fellow colony members. Instinctively implementing the ZigBee Principle, bees around the world industriously sustain productive hives and foster future generations of colony members.


But besides the entertainment value, I'm not very impressed, neither by the website, nor by it's content or their 'mission'.
Best,

B.

QUASAR9 said...

Hi Bee, I wonder if bees use oscillating neutrinos when doing their zig-zag (ZigBee) dance.

Also in 'previous' comment I meant Bees collecting pollen, to turn into honey in the hive ...
Nature is truly wonderful turning or churning this into that

iamvisheshur said...

scary..well i wont hurt another fly..

a quantum diaries survivor said...

I find that somehow, details are always obscene...
Really amazing pictures anyway.
Cheers,
T.

Dimitri Terryn said...

Great find! I had no idea it was possible to produces images with this kind of clarity.

Lumo said...

Hi Bee, good photos. BTW there are also Americans who think that the Harvey's place joke was less funny than offensive - see here.

stefan said...

Dear Bee,

I've turned the preview off. They've sent me a message that there will be an update some time that can be customized.

Ah, that may be a good idea. In fact, I quite liekd the preview, because in general, it shows quite nicely what one my expect from the link

But as it is right now, it started annoying me. Not so much because of the preview itself, but because on most links one had to click twice before one could use it - anybody else noticed that?

Hm, this seems to depend on the browser. With Safari/MacOS, it's OK with one click on the link, after the preview has popped up. But yes,

What I would actually like to have is the possibility to turn the feature on or of in my brower, not for a website.

that would be good... I doubt, however, how this could work. I think it should be possible to provide on the web site a button, so that each user can switch on/off the preview... Let's see what snap will develop...

Best, stefan