Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Happy Birthday

... it's four years of backreaction today!


Steven Colyer said...

Happy Birthday to youuuuu
Happy Birthsay to youuuu
Happy Birthday, Dear Backreaction,
Happy Birthday to you.

And, thanks to Google Translator:

Alles Gute zum Geburtstag zu youuuuu
Birthsay glücklich zu youuuu
Alles Gute zum Geburtstag, liebe Backreaction,
Alles Gute zum Geburtstag für Sie.

Bee said...

These flowers look VERY familiar :-)

Bee said...

There is actually a German version of "Happy Birthday," it's "Zum Geburtstag viel Glueck."

Arun said...

Dear Bee,

Happy Birthday to your creation, and hope you and Stefan have as much fun continuing to write this blog as we readers have in reading it!

Even the occasional weird characters that appear in the comments section remind us that human sanity is very fragile and precious; enjoy it while you have it!


Plato said...

After 4 Years, moderation?

Regardless, happy birthday.


Bee said...

Hi Plato,

Stefan turned on comment moderation yesterday since I was offline and he was at work, not having time to sort out the insults from from previous posts. It turned out to be unnecessary though, except for our friend in Pilsen who had a comment deleted, and the goatboy who had his last comment unpublished (it contained further insults of my person together with the obligatory complain about censorship) everybody stayed polite and reasonable. I believe that's to some amount due to having disabled anonymous comments. In any case, I've turned comment moderation off now, so your comments will be published without delay. Best,


Phil Warnell said...

Hi Bee & Stefan,

Happy Birthday Backreaction!!!!! I wish I could boast I’ve looked on since it’s beginnings yet I can’t with only then wishing that I had. However since my first discovering it I’ve enjoyed taking in and learning plenty about what’s going on at the cutting edge of physics from the point of view of those that participate and contribute. More importantly though I’ve come to know something about the hearts and minds of a truly wonderful couple for which I wish all the best in the coming years.

Happy Birthday!!!!!,


cvj said...



tspin said...

Gratz, and thanks for interesting articles.

Uncle Al said...

Evaggelos said...

keep walking Backreaction!!!

Plato said...

Thanks for the explanation Bee.

Uncle why are you procrastinating.:) You know how to make direct links?

For images, just use the "a href" as you would a link and it will take you to image. Use "properties" to be exact as to url link choice.

Took a bit, but the rest of the crew here "got it" by example now there all "youtubers.":)

I imagine if one was artistic enough one could come forth with their "own image" of this evolution? A onion vegetable( a pearl) with tubal?

As if, a slight deviation in the skull can make room for the way we now use the brain in correlation with the internet?:)


Neil B said...

Congrats Bee and Stefan (and others who must help make it possible) on four years of Backreaction. I see the other regular crew have rightly chimed in (BTW that phrase should be OK in cases of approval like here) as well as others, and of note. I note again that the interdisciplinary posts are very cogent and interesting, and perhaps more "important" in a sense since there's so much regular science all over the place. But good socio-cultural science blend is hard to find. Also if readers have Facebook you will find lots of clever slice of life comments at Bee's page.

BTW, I found some interesting and relevant anniversaries in history of science, but the below might interest Bee and Stefan in particular because of subject, nationality, married collaborators, and inferred slighting of women scientists in the past (and still?) From :

Ida Noddack
Born 25 Feb 1896; died 1979.
German chemist who co-discovered (1925) element 75, rhenium, which they named after the Rhine River. ... She was working with Walter Noddack, her future husband (1926). ... She commented on the possibility of fission upon hearing the reports of Fermi's 1934 observations of the neutron bombardment of uranium. Her idea remained dormant. However, when Frisch, five years afterwards, presented the same idea, it became accepted. ...

I suppose that means: since I don't hear much about her now, that she got neither much attention for the proposal, or credit later.

PS: considering the blog name, maybe a post on "backreaction" in physics would be nice. I note that Wikipedia's article on "back-reaction" is very small, maybe someone could fill that in more.
Also, I suppose Google Translator is getting better at phrases, but we still need to be careful with it.

Neil B said...

(Well, one day off but it was a relevant catch.)

Jérôme CHAUVET said...

Gibt es einen schönen Geschenk, an den ich denken kann? Mmmm, lass mich mal bitte ein bisschen überlegen...

Doch ich weiss: Der Lumo im Geburtstagkuchen, der raus aus dem Geburtstagkuchen springt, und sagt: "Ja, andere Theorien können AUCH sein!"

Geil, nee?

stefan said...

Dear all,

thanks for the good wishes!

Hi Steven,

"Backreaction" embedded in a German phrase ("Alles Gute zum Geburtstag, liebe Backreaction") is really funny, as it makes you read it as something related to "backen", i.e baking ;-)

Hi Neil,

thanks for pointing out Ida Noddack's birthday, I wasn't aware of that.

I came across her name when I looked a bit into the history of technetium a while ago for a post (which should be continued...)

It seems she and her husband thought to have discovered this element (known then as a remaining gap in the periodic table), but that discovery turned out to be spurious. I don't know while she is more or less unknown today...

Cheers, Stefan

Georg said...

Hello Bee,
congratulations to 4th anniversary
of Your creation.
Stefan: one of the questions from
that old thread on Tc (why there is no
stable isotop) is answered in
Finkelnburg, Einführung in die
Atomphysik, 11te + 12te Auflage
Springer 1967 S. 270 f.

stefan said...

Hallo Georg,

thanks for the hint, I'll try to find a copy of the book... I remember it from my undergrad days. I'm still looking for some explanation why the odd-even parabolas for binding energy and the Mattauch rules "conspire" to just make element 43 unstable...

Best, Stefan

Wolfgang said...



in the previous comment thread you complain that you cannot comment on my utterly dumb blog. That is too bad, because I welcome every input.

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